June Newsletter 2019

Winter is here


This month our regular champion is an international client who has worked in the most amazing places!

How do we get out daily dose of Vitamin D if we are deficient in it? Read our article to find out!

Our recipe of the month is a tasty and easy recipe: Salmon, Sweet Potato and Coriander Fishcakes!

Contents

corehealth Monthly Special
corehealth Inspiration
Regular Champions
corehealth Health
Recipe of the Month – Salmon, Sweet Potato and Coriander Fishcakes

corehealth Monthly Special

 Winter is here! Attend an extra session (EP,GE or StretchUp) this month to warm yourself up and receive 10% off the first session!

For newsletter subscribers only. Make sure to mention this edition of the newsletter to redeem your offer. Terms and conditions do apply, talk to staff before booking in.

corehealth Inspiration

“The flower that blooms in adversity is the rarest and most beautiful of all.”
– Mulan, Walt Disney

corehealth Regular Champions

This month’s regular champion is Roshan, a big cricket fan who has worked all over the world and decided to settle down in Adelaide!

How long have you been in Adelaide?
I have been in Adelaide since Oct 1999.

Where were you prior to Adelaide?
I am originally from Sri Lanka and started my working career in the Maldives and then moved to London to finish my studies and then worked in Ghana before moving to Adelaide

How did your journey with corehealth start?
My GP referred me to corehealth with pain in the left hip that referred down to the thigh and calf

What do you like about corehealth?
Very friendly staff / atmosphere and the personal attention provided

What do you do for a living?
I run my own business dealing in International trading primarily supplying raw materials and consumables for the Cement and Steel industries. Based in South Australia we coordinate supply chain management primarily from South East Asia to our customers pre-dominantly based in Africa

You are a new client to the clinic how are you finding the first 3 months?
The program has focused on strengthening of my muscles. It has been an intensive journey of learning with making time from work but has been useful.

What encouragement would you give to a new client starting their journey at the clinic?
corehealth uses a structured program in their treatment which is closely monitored and reviewed. They also provide very detailed feedback on the condition

Roshan, you have lived in various different countries, what would be your favourite country and why?
All the countries were excellent, and each had a different lifestyle. I would say Maldives was the best. The country is so beautiful and working conditions are very flexible. Abundance of Fish and lobsters. Maldives consists of 1200 small islands of which only 200 are inhabited. I used to work in a Tourist resort which is just one island and it is like a country by itself. Power station to generate electricity, Telecommunications tower, Warehouses and cold storerooms to carry sufficient stocks. Most of the groceries, vegetables are imported and is transported by dhoni (boats) from the capital male’. Travelling from one Island to another in the boat can be challenging at times when the weather is bad but overall still enjoyed living in Maldives

What do you enjoy doing outside of your sessions?
Enjoy watching sports especially cricket

What is the lifestyle and living conditions in Sri Lanka like compared to Australia and what made you move to Australia and specifically Adelaide?
Sri Lanka is a beautiful country with its beaches, the famous Ceylon Tea which you find in the hill country (mountain region), wild reserves where you find elephants and other animals, bird sanctuary and with a very rich history of ancient Kingdoms. Sri Lanka has varying varieties of Fruits and Vegetables and due to the tropical climate, they can be enjoyed throughout the year. In Australia the living conditions are very good where you can have a very balanced lifestyle. After living overseas, we wanted to move to a country to settle down permanently and Australia fitted our requirements and we did not have any second thoughts to call Australia home. I moved to Adelaide as my wife was offered a place at the University of Adelaide to complete her PHD program at the Waite Campus.

You have such a love for the game of cricket. What fascinates you about it?
Cricket just runs in the blood of all Sri Lankans or who hail from Sri Lanka. It is a game embraced from childhood from all parts and which unites the country.  One team plays first and tries to score many runs as possible to set a target then the next team plays to chase down the target. What fascinates me is everything that happens in between. Also, Cricket is considered a Gentleman’s game.

Thanks Roshan, we wish you all the best on your future endeavours and sessions here at corehealth!

Written by Kaleb Wilden

corehealth Health

How to Get Your Daily Dose of Vitamin D in Winter

Living in Australia you would think that there should be no problems getting your daily does of vitamin D. However, deficiency of vitamin D is common in Australia with over 30% of the population having either mild, moderate or severe deficiency. For most Australian’s the sunshine is the main source of vitamin D, therefore with less hours of sunshine in winter it can become difficult to maintain sufficient levels of vitamin D.

Vitamin D has an essential role in maintaining bone health by improving the absorption of calcium. It helps to control calcium levels in your blood and maintain muscle and bone strength. It has also been shown that it can boost your immunity and offer protection from colds and the flu. Low levels can lead to risk of bone fractures and can lead to joint pain and muscle weakness.

You may be at risk of low vitamin D levels if:

  • You are naturally darker in skin tone (as a darker pigment reduces the penetration of UV light)
  • If you are elderly, frail or obese
  • You work indoors or nightshifts
  • If you need to avoid sun exposure due to other medial issues
  • You may have other medical issues that affect the way your body absorbs/processes vitamin D

Absorption of vitamin D varies on a range of individual factors and there is no set of rules around how to increase/maintain levels. Some general recommendations include that from May to August if you have fair to olive skin experts suggest 2-3 hours of sun exposure to the face/arms and hands over a week. Fairer skin requires less exposure to the sun compared to olive or darker skin tones. Some foods can provide a source of vitamin D but you cannot get your required amount from just food. Some foods include mushrooms, cheese, egg yolks, fatty fish and some milk products. Supplements are another way you can boost your levels. After making changes if will take a few months to see changes in your vitamin D levels.

If you are concerned about your vitamin D levels or at risk of having a vitamin D deficiency then seeing a GP for a blood test can determine if you need to make any lifestyle changes.

References:

https://www.osteoporosis.org.au/sites/default/files/files/vitdconsumerguide.pdf

https://www.blackmores.com.au/cold-flu-and-immunity/how-to-get-your-daily-dose-of-vitamin-d-in-winter

https://www.cancer.org.au/preventing-cancer/sun-protection/vitamin-d/

Written by Hannah Zwar

Recipe of the month

Salmon, Sweet Potato and Coriander Fishcakes


Ingredients

1 large sweet potato

2 tbsp tahini

1 lemon , ½ zested and juiced, ½ cut into wedges

1 small pack coriander (stalks and all)

½ tsp coriander seeds

2 skinless and boneless salmon fillets, cut into chunks

1 tbsp plain flour

1 tbsp olive oil

salad, to serve

Method

  1. Peel the sweet potato and cut into rough chunks, then put in a microwaveable bowl with a splash of water. Cover with cling film, then cook on high for 8 mins. Meanwhile, whisk the tahini with the lemon juice and enough water to make a thick dressing. Season and set aside.
  2. Carefully remove the cling film from the sweet potato, then blitz in a food processor. Leave to cool for a couple of mins, then add the coriander and coriander seeds. Blitz to a herby mash, then add the salmon, lemon zest, flour and some seasoning. Pulse again – you want the salmon to be roughly mixed in, rather than obliterated to mush.
  3. Shape into four fishcakes. Chill in the fridge if you have time. Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Add the fishcakes and fry for 5 mins on each side until crisp and golden. Serve with the lemon wedges, tahini dressing and salad.
– Suggested by Marissa